Monday, April 6, 2009

Keeping Y-Search Up to Date


To the HAM DNA Project Participants:

I had been looking at mapped locations of (existing) towns called "Ham" in England tonight, and noticed that there are some possibilities of matching the FTDNA numbers with the locations of these towns. (There are more than two dozen towns in Britain called "Ham," about six "Ham Hill" locations, about seven "Ham Green" locations, etc.)

The best way to match DNA locations is with Y-Search.

Now, FTDNA hopes for a push in Britain in the upcoming year, so it is becoming more important to keep our Y-Search information up to date.

I say that because there is one town called "Ham" about 10 miles from Crewkerne (near Illminster), and another town called "Ham" near London. As you may recall from the 2007 DNA video, our Group #1 roughly matches these two areas in Y-Search. Our Franklin County line may have some parallels to the town called "Ham" near Frome (or Wells), if you recall the blog article about Glastonbury ties, for example. Tony, of course, has ancestors that come from a town called "Ham" near Brent Knoll (not too far from Wedmore).

Other possible examples could be the town of Ham near Plymouth, which the HAM lines from Maine are researching. (It would help if the HAM lines from Maine were participating in the DNA Project.)

Or possibility, since our Group #2 is matching Worchestershire, that puts them closest to the town called "Ham" (north of Bristol). Or, if our Group #4 is matching County Kent, there is a small town in County Kent called "Ham" near Sandwich (no pun intended).

You can check these maps out at Streetmap: http://www.streetmap.co.uk/


When we start getting participants in Britain, we should be getting some interesting information.

So, it is important to keep your Y-Search information up to date so that we have accurate information about our matches. Please enter your information on your oldest known ancestor correctly. In my case, that would be William HAM from Virginia, since any further ancestor has not yet been positively identified to date.

It was in May, 2008 that FTDNA changed the Haplotype Groupings:

This affected the following existing groups:


R1b1c became R1b1b2

I1a became I1

I1b became I

I1c became I2b

E3b1a became E1b1b1


Back then, I understood that FTDNA would be changing the Y-Search haplotype groups for us. But when I checked my Y-Search ID tonight, my haplotype group had been changed from "I1a" to "Unknown."

I had to manually set my haplotype group at the Y-Search database. So, I would guess everybody will need to check their haplotype group out there. This should help us to identify matches from other vendors as well.

You can change it by logging into Y-Search at:

http://www.ysearch.org/

- select "Edit An Existing User" (that would be your ID)

and the "Haplogroup" is just below the area with the DYS values, under your "Last name"

If you have not yet submitted your information to Y-Search, then you can do that by visiting your personal web page at FTDNA.




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